Weapons of Mass Intervention

The Power of Prayer and Why it is Under Attack


If you arrived here via my Welcome page you will already realise that the silencing of Christians during the lunacy of 2020 doesn’t sit well with me. If you arrived here directly, this is what I had to say:

‘Christian voices were silenced at a moment in history when they should have been at their loudest. I for one have no wish to remain silent. It’s time our voices were heard.’

In using the term ‘were silenced’ I’ve clearly expressed the view that this ‘gag order’ has been deliberate.

I’m writing this post to explain why I believe the action – or rather the attack – has been pre-meditated, targeted and strategic. First of all, I’ll give one recent example of Christian suppression.

On September 23rd, three Christian men were arrested in Moscow for participating in an outdoor worship service.

This snippet of news may not surprise many, given that the event occurred in Moscow. However, this didn’t happen in Moscow, Russia, but in Moscow in the state of Idaho, USA.

The United States of America, home to the largest Christian population in the world; a nation in which sixty-two percent of polled adults claim to be active members of a church congregation; a nation whose Pledge of Allegiance states:

‘I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.’

Sadly, repression of Christian worship in America is not limited to Idaho.

Idaho is one of many states in which severe restrictions on church gatherings and worship are enforced. For example, the California state governor has banned totally all indoor worship.

Meanwhile, in San Fransisco, the city’s Mayor, not satisfied with the usual two metre distancing ruling enforced across many nations, has ordered that only one person at a time may be permitted to enter houses of worship. Perhaps the man, London Breed, is all too aware of Jesus’ assurance stated in the book of Matthew:

‘For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them.’

Matthew 18:20

What are world leaders, such as Mayor Breed, so afraid of that they seek to prevent Christians from meeting together? Why do they seek to forcibly silence those who engage in vocal worship?

I’ll tell you what I think – in my own meandering way, so please bear with me.


To retake Port Stanley from Argentinian invaders in 1982, the British army advanced overland in what was a gruelling forced-march in full kit over difficult terrain. Between them and their goal were a series of hill defences upon which the Argentinian forces were heavily entrenched and well equipped with artillery and mortars.

The battles to retake these hill-top defences generally took place at night. During one such battle, to capture the hills known as Two Sisters, the British were again outnumbered, their enemy well dug-in and heavily armed.

The fighting was bitter, with artillery shells and mortar fire raining down on the British soldiers who, by that time were exhausted and almost out of ammunition. Things were desperate. The attack to retake the hills was about to stall.

The British commanding officer, Clive Dytor, then fixed his bayonet and ran screaming at the opposing forces, firing from the hip. His men quickly followed suit and charged the enemy lines, yelling like berserkers. Though heavily outnumbered, their fearsome attack so demoralised their enemy that the British quickly overwhelmed the Argentinian defences.

Outnumbered, outgunned, and open to enemy fire the British employed fear to discourage and dis-empower their enemy. And it worked.


I’ll now dial the clock back further, to 1944.

The second episode of the 2001 TV series ‘Band of Brothers’ is titled ‘Day of Days’. It covers events occurring on D-Day. During the episode, Easy Company are tasked with performing an airborne landing behind enemy lines prior to the beach-landing of the main invasion force.

Allied commanders were aware that the enemy had positioned heavy artillery in bunkers behind the beach-line defences. They knew that, unless they were disabled, the heavy fire from these would rain down on the allied soldiers and may even prevent a successful landing. Easy Company’s mission was to attack the bunkers and put the guns out of action.

For the invasion to have a chance of success, the greatest threat had to be silenced.

These examples suggest two things:

  • When attacking well-protected opponents from a weaker position, fear may be successfully employed as a weapon.
  • For operational success, it is vital that those elements which represent the greatest risk to the mission are neutralised. The heavy guns.

I make no apology for including examples of military conflict when discussing this year’s silencing of the Christian community. Anyone who can’t see that what is taking place right now is a war of epic proportions is simply not paying attention.

As I’ve alluded to several times already on this site, we’re witnessing history being made on a scale this generation has never seen. Many people, however, remain ignorant of this reality as much of it is unreported, downplayed or misrepresented in our media.

Nevertheless, Christian commentators familiar with Biblical end-time prophecy, are sitting up and paying attention.

This brings me to a further quote from my Welcome page:

‘I am sure [events of 2020] will eventually come to be recognised as, not only an attack on humanity, but an attack on Christianity.’

One might consider this to be a touch melodramatic, or take the view that, as buildings of worship are now re-opened, everything is hunky-dory. Such a view would be a mistake.

Bearing in mind my summary of the two historical examples above, here is a sample of text taken from the UK government’s ‘Guidance for the Safe Use of Places of Worship …’

The UK is currently experiencing a public health emergency as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The transmission characteristics of COVID-19 are outlined by Public Health England. The transmission of COVID-19 is thought to occur mainly through respiratory droplets generated by coughing and sneezing, and through contact with contaminated surfaces. The predominant modes of transmission are assumed to be droplet and contact.

‘… fear may be successfully employed as a weapon.’

I’ve extracted the following from similar guidelines produced by the local church which, until recently, I regularly attended:

There will be no singing by the congregation or raised voices.

‘… it is vital that those elements which represent the greatest risk to the mission are neutralised.’

To understand why I no longer attend that church I suggest you visit my post ‘A Question of Obedience’. Once there, consider those enforced regulations and judge for yourself whether they represent freedom to worship or Christian persecution.

So, why would anyone suppress the act of Christian worship, using fear of a virus to do so?

I’ve already hinted at the answer to that question above, but I’ll elaborate here:

Christians, and their power of prayer are the big guns. Effective, target-focussed prayer represents such an overwhelming threat to those in service to Satan that, to have any chance at success in whatever evil agenda their’s may be, it is vital that they muzzle Christ’s army.

Furthermore, as with the Falklands’ example above, our oppressors have launched their attack from a position of weakness, using fear as their weapon.

I know from personal experience that prayer brings results. However, before sitting to write this post, I consulted a number of books in my collection to gain a fuller understanding of the true potency of prayer.

It’s unsurprising that my first and most trusted resource was the Bible. Here, there’s a multitude of scriptural references on the subject. Perhaps one of the most pivotal examples is this statement given by Jesus:

‘Truly I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. Again I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything they ask, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven. For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them.’

Matthew 18:18-20

Prayer, however, is not a contrivance with which, like petulant children, we appeal to God into satisfying our every wants.

The act of prayer is a cool-headed acceptance of our true situation before our heavenly Father. It’s also an admission of our need for His intervention in our lives.

It isn’t something we simply do for ourselves, ‘intercession’ is a prayer by which Christians pray for others. We are urged to intercede for other people. Used this way, prayer is both unifying and strengthening.

In his Concise Commentary, Matthew Henry wrote:

‘The disciples of Christ must be praying people; all, without distinction of nation, sect, rank, or party.’

Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary of the Whole Bible

I take comfort in the fact that the power of prayer isn’t determined by the one praying. Its success isn’t dependent on a magic formula of buzzwords, scriptural slogans or godly gobbledygook. It’s in an honest, open hearted and reverent approach to God. The almighty power resides in Him, of who Jesus said:

‘… with God all things are possible.’

Matthew 19:26

Unfortunately, the power we have available to us through our authority in prayer is widely underestimated. Our enemy, however, knows full well our true potential.

It is for this reason those prominent and priviledged pawns strutting on Satan’s chessboard have sought to demoralise, muzzle and silence Christians worldwide.


It’s time our voices were heard!


‘The prayer preceding all prayers is “May it be the real I who speaks. May it be the real Thou that I speak to.”’

C.S. Lewis

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